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Adoption

  • If you’re thinking about adopting a cat, consider taking home two. Cats require exercise, mental stimulation and social interaction. Two cats can provide this for each other.
  • A mixed breed dog living at a shelter has a high chance of being euthanized. Adopting one means you are directly saving a life, a fact your grateful new dog will not soon forget.
  • One of the greatest things about bringing home a rescue pet is that it changes an animal’s life — and your own. Shelter pets are just happy to get families and homes. What could be better than that?
  • If you’re set on getting a purebred dog, 15 to 25 percent of animals found at shelters are purebreds. The best way to find particular breeds of dogs is to reach out to breed-specific rescue groups or search on adoption sites.
  • Pets don’t always end up in shelters because of a problem with their temperament, health or behavior. They end up there for many reasons, often having to do with the humans, not the pets.
  • If you want to help a shelter pet but can’t commit to adopting one, fostering can be a great choice. You’ll help a shelter relieve crowding and allow the pet some time to adjust to a home environment.
  • Adopting a blind or deaf pet, one with 3 legs or a serious medical issue is not easy. However many people feel they are the ones who benefit from having a special-needs pet.
  • Adult and senior dogs need to be adopted just as much as younger pets. Some advantages of adopting a senior pets are: they are often already housetrained, know basic commands, make less mess and are less destructive than young pets.
  • With good care, most dogs can live 12 to 15 years and most cats can live 15 to 20 years. It is critical that you consider what is likely to be happening in your own life over the next 15 to 20 years — before you adopt a pet.
  • When getting a new pet, consider adoption. Many animals end up in shelters for various reasons at various ages. Check with local shelters, humane societies and rescues to find a pet that will meet your needs.
  • Most cats, particularly kittens, flourish with a friend. Two cats are indeed better than one, and adopting three might even work if you’re dedicated to their care and are willing to receive three times the love.
  • Each spring during kitten season, thousands of newborn kittens join millions of cats already in shelters across the country. Our local shelters and rescues have tons of cute, cuddly newborns, in addition to all the mellow, older cats and everything in between.
  • Ever considered fostering a cat? Fosters play a huge role by temporarily providing cats with a loving home where they can be nurtured and socialized. This also frees up shelter space to take in more homeless kitties.
  • National Mutt Day is July 31 and is all about embracing, saving and celebrating mixed breed dogs. There are millions of loving and healthy mixed breed dogs sitting in shelters, desperately searching for a new home.
  • Assistance Dogs can be from a variety of breeds including, but not limited to: Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, Standard Poodles, as well as shelter dogs.
  • When adopting a pet avoid impulse decisions and select one that is suited to your home and lifestyle. Commit to the relationship for the life of your pet(s) and provide exercise and mental stimulation.
  • There are many cats and kittens in shelters in need of homes! They have no one to celebrate National Cat Day with them. If you have the time and resources to do so, consider giving one (or two) a loving forever home.
  • Animal shelters across the country are full of animals of all shapes, sizes, breeds and ages. Senior pets are typically the most difficult to place and often spend the most time in the shelter.
  • Some advantages of adopting a senior pet are: they know the rules, make less mess and are less destructive than young pets. Older pets can be great matches for seniors, or those who enjoy a less active lifestyle.
  • While puppies and kittens are adorable, with an older pet you see what you get and you know what to expect. Senior cats and dogs are fully grown, their personalities have developed, and many are already trained.
  • Adopting a grown-up pet can provide comfort in knowing you’re giving a home to an animal who may otherwise be overlooked. For many adopters, giving an older animal a home is an act of compassion.
  • Consider giving a shelter pet the gift of a new furever home. Most shelter animals are there through no fault of their own. Issues like death, divorce and job loss often lead owners to surrender pets.
  • Consider fostering a shelter pet. These volunteers are a huge help as they provide homeless pets with temporary shelter and care. Just think, for every pet living in a foster home, the shelter has space to take in another pet.
  • Just because a shelter doesn’t have the kind of pet you’re looking for doesn’t mean it can’t help you find one. Many shelters have transfer programs that allow them to move animals in high demand in one area from shelters in areas that have too many of them.