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Cats

  • However you provide it, clean fresh water is necessary to your cat’s overall health. The sound of circulating water in automatic drinking fountains is appealing to some cats.
  • When it is cold outside, bang on the hood of your car before driving away to startle any cat that might have crawled onto the engine block where it’s warm. This can prevent serious injuries or even death.
  • Like dogs, cats use their tails to signal their moods. A confident, contented cat will hold her tail high in the air as she moves about. If the top third twitches as she nears you, she totally adores you!
  • Hyperthyroidism is a hormone-related illness affecting mostly older cats. Rapid weight loss, an increased appetite and often an increased activity level are common signs. It is treatable and is diagnosed with a simple blood test.
  • Having accidents outside of the litter box is the number-one behavior problem in cats. However, it could be your cat’s way of telling you something is physically wrong. Don’t wait to contact your veterinarian. You won’t want your kitty establishing a bad habit.
  • Any time your cat’s personality or behavior abruptly changes, it’s a sign that something may be amiss physically. It’s always a good idea to contact us right away.
  • Never use a dog flea and tick product on a cat. Cats are sensitive to some of the chemicals in dog flea and tick formulations. Using the wrong product on a cat can cause problems ranging from mild skin irritation to severe nervous system problems and even death.
  • Older cats often have a difficult time keeping their nails groomed. Cat nails can become very thick and overgrow into the skin. Check nails weekly and trim them once a month to prevent overgrowth and injury.
  • Does your older cat have a dull coat or is (s)he getting more mats and tangles? Arthritis may be the reason he is grooming less. Joint supplements like Dasuquin® can help reduce inflammation and keep your kitty flexible and comfortable.
  • Did you know cats sleep an average of fifteen to twenty hours per day? They prefer to be awake in the twilight hours around dawn and dusk: not very surprising to you cat lovers out there!
  • Cats can be bathed weekly to every six months. Be sure to use pet grooming shampoo, protect the eyes and rinse with tepid water.
  • Does your cat vomit regularly? Studies indicate that there may be a medical reason for this regularly “mistaken” behavior. The three most common causes are inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis and lymphoma.
  • Did you know cats have a visual field of 200°? That means they can see a bit behind them; an advantage when hunting small fast -moving prey (or laser pointers).
  • When it comes to introducing a new cat to other pets in your house, do it very slowly. Provide a safe place to which the cat can retreat, so it can slowly adjust to a new environment.
  • Frequent brushing helps reduce hairballs by eliminating the amount of fur a cat ingests while grooming. Hill’s® Science Diet® Hairball Control cat food assists in moving hair through your cat’s intestinal tract and nourishes the skin and coat to reduce unnecessary shedding.
  • Although cats sleep up to 16 hours a day, three quarters of that sleep is snoozing, not deep sleep. Cats spend nearly a third of their waking hours grooming.
  • Kidney disease is a leading cause of death in dogs and cats. Signs of this disease don’t appear until 75% of the kidney tissue is lost, which is why regular blood and urine screenings are recommended. When kidney disease is detected early, pets often live many years with treatment.
  • Cats are true carnivores. Their nutritional needs are only met by eating a diet that is meat-based because many of the nutrients they require are only found in meat. Cats cannot get adequate nutrition from dog food.
  • The lifespans of outdoor cats average about three to five years. Indoor cats have lives that last 16 years or more.
  • An average cat can make around 100 vocal sounds. Meowing is solely for grabbing the attention of humans; fellow cats get other forms of vocalization.
  • Is your kitty bored? Cats can be entertained for hours by simply leaving out an empty box or paper bag (no plastic!) for them to explore, climb into and bat with their paws.
  • Bringing a cat into your home is a little bit like having a toddler. Assume everything will be interesting to your new companion, and try to cat-proof as much as possible.
  • Place your kitty’s litterbox in an area where there’s not a lot of activity. Cats won’t go to the bathroom in a place that is loud or congested, so keep your box somewhere that is quiet and calm.
  • Because of their small size and natural agility, cats often hide pain. Studies show that 90% of cats over age 12 have evidence of arthritis on an X-ray.
  • Cats need to be in stimulating and comfortable surroundings. Be sure to provide plenty of toys, hiding spots, scratching posts and elevated resting areas in your home.
  • Cats have whiskers above the eyelids, around the muzzle and on the lower inside part of their forelegs that help them move smoothly in the dark.
  • Cats like to be up high. If you don’t want your cat “counter surfing”, give him/her alternate places to sit, such as tall cat trees, shelves and stools.
  • It’s a myth that cats need milk. Many cats don’t care for milk; others are lactose intolerant and milk can cause an upset tummy in those kitties.
  • In general, cats prefer clumping litter with sand-like texture (in large uncovered boxes) placed in quiet, easily accessible locations in their most frequently visited areas.
  • Veterinary research indicates a stressful home environment may be the root cause of some chronic cat diseases, including interstitial cystitis. This is a painful and chronic inflammation of bladder tissue. It is the most commonly diagnosed cause of feline bladder conditions.
  • Cats tend to withdraw when they don’t feel well, so a cat that is not spending time in his or her usual places may have a problem.
  • Cats spend a lot of time grooming! Not a big surprise…Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine found that cats spend between 30 and 50 percent of their days cleaning themselves.
  • Hyperthyroidism is common in older cats and is diagnosed with a blood test. The most common sign is weight loss due to an increased rate of metabolism despite an increased appetite.
  • Dogs and cats have a third eyelid located inside the lower eyelid. It serves as an additional protective layer, especially during hunting or fighting. It contains a gland that produces a portion of the tear film. It helps keep their eyes safe from dryness and dirt.
  • All feline tongues are covered with tiny barbs. These microscopic projections face toward the cat’s throat. The barbs work like a comb, catching and cleaning the cat’s fur.
  • Consider this when you select a name for your cat: It is believed that cats respond more readily to names ending in ‘-ie’ or ‘-y.’
  • Increased water intake is important for older cats, since they are prone to conditions that can cause dehydration and constipation. Offering canned food and using multiple water dishes can help increase water intake.
  • There are 10 million more cats owned in America than dogs. Yet cats are less than half as likely to be seen by a veterinarian and receive healthcare.
  • One great reason to spay or neuter pets is to avoid adding to pet overpopulation. Of the 6-8 million pets entering shelters each year, one-half are euthanized, many of which are young and healthy.
  • Have your pet examined by a veterinarian at least once or twice a year – it is more likely that any health problems will be found earlier before they become serious or life-threatening.
  • In addition to food, water, shelter, veterinary care and companionship, pets need both physical and mental stimulation in the form of exercise and play. Both need to be appropriate to your pet’s age, breed, species and health status.
  • Most cats, particularly kittens, flourish with a friend. Two cats are indeed better than one, and adopting three might even work if you’re dedicated to their care and are willing to receive three times the love.
  • While cats make purr-fect pets for some people, they don’t for others. Cats are dependent on their owners for all their needs — food, water, medical attention, exercise, shelter, and, most important, companionship.
  • Do you want a cat with long, medium, or short hair? Long-haired cats require almost daily brushing to keep their fur from matting, so be prepared to spend regular time grooming these cats.
  • 80% of your pet’s body is made of water, while humans are only made up of 60% water. Dogs and cats need at least one ounce of water per pound each day. Fresh water in clean bowls at all times is a must!
  • Pets can become dehydrated when their body fluid levels drop to less than normal. Fluid loss can be due to overheating in hot weather or from vomiting or diarrhea, especially in puppies.
  • All cats can benefit from increased water intake, and is essential in the presence of kidney disease or lower urinary tract disease. Since most cats don’t like changes in their food it’s a good idea to introduce canned food in small amounts when it is a kitten.
  • Brushing your cat regularly will help remove excess fur before it is ingested when cats groom themselves. It is also a great way to bond with your cat and can be used as a reward; a little positive reinforcement goes a long way!
  • Not only can cats jump they can leap straight upward. They can jump up to five times their own height in just one leap and land softly on any object they choose as a landing site.
  • Cats groom themselves more when they’re warm. The saliva on their fur helps cool them down like sweat does on our skin.
  • Felines, especially indoor cats, thrive in an enriched environment. Ensure they have enough stimulation, places to hide and opportunities for regular exercise. This will keep them healthy, happy and stress free.
  • Cats have better night vision than humans and only need one-sixth the light we need to see in the dark. They have more rods which are required for low-light vision.
  • Cats are America’s #1 companion and yet they see veterinarians less frequently than dogs. Celebrate National Cat Day in October by taking your cat to the vet for an annual wellness visit. Healthy cats are happy cats!
  • Owning a cat has health benefits. Spending time with a cat can boost your mood and reduce stress. The simple act of petting a cat can be beneficial to one’s health – both for the action itself and from the purrs that result.
  • Even indoor cats should be vaccinated for rabies. There’s always the chance, however small, that an indoor-only cat might sneak outdoors through an open window or door.
  • Over 50% of cats haven’t seen their vet in the past year. Since cats are masters at hiding illness it is important they have regular exams and diagnositic testing. This will help detect many serious medical conditions before they become severe.
  • Risk factors for diabetes in cats include age (older cats), genetics, neutered males, chronic pancreatitis, hyperthyroidism, obesity and physical inactivity. Ask your veterinarian for more information.