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Dental Health

  • Anesthesia-free dental cleaning is not recommended because it does not allow cleaning or inspection below the gumline, which is where most dental disease occurs. It can also result in injury to the pet or the person performing the procedure.
  • Periodontal (gum) disease is the number one diagnosed problem in dogs and cats. Scientific studies indicate a strong link between good oral health and vital organs such as the heart and kidneys.
  • 80% of all dogs over age two have signs of dental disease. It is more common in small dogs because they are more likely to have overcrowded or misaligned teeth that are difficult to keep clean.
  • Some puppies don’t lose their baby teeth normally which can lead to crowding in the mouth and an abnormal bite. Retained teeth may need to be extracted at about six months of age.
  • Never give a puppy or dog anything to chew on that is harder than its own teeth. This includes cow bones, nylon bones and other real bones. They can break a dog’s teeth which can be quite painful.
  • By the age of just two, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some form of periodontal (gum) disease. Signs include bad breath, yellow-brown crust on teeth, bleeding gums, change in chewing or eating habits, tooth loss and abnormal drooling.
  • Pets with dental disease have bacteria on the teeth which can enter the bloodstream, leading to systemic infections. Organs most often affected are heart, liver and kidneys.
  • Daily brushing is the foundation of oral care. By brushing your pet’s teeth daily, you can make a big impact on your pet’s oral health. We can demonstrate how to brush.
  • Three important aspects of a dental care program include regular professional exams, professional care (prevention and treatment if needed) and effective home care. Dental care is just as important for pets as it is for us.
  • Although peridontal disease is found more frequently in older pets, its effects begin in younger animals. Inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) often develops by age two. Without proper care it will progress causing irreversible damage in the mouth or other organs.
  • It is important to have your pet’s teeth examined annually. See your veterinarian to determine the type of dental care best suited for your pet.
  • Signs of gum disease: bad breath, yellow-brown crust or tarter around the gum line, an apparent pain and/or bleeding when your pet eats or when its mouth or gums are touched.
  • Don’t wait a lifetime to clean your pets teeth. Fight the infection that breeds in decaying teeth and gums that ultimately causes more problems for your pet than lost teeth.
  • Keep your pets healthy by including dental care to their routine. Pet toothpaste is available in a variety of flavors including malt and the ever-so-popular poultry flavor!
  • Small breed dogs often have trouble losing their baby teeth. Retained teeth collect debris and tartar and promote dental disease. These teeth should be extracted immediately.
  • Can’t brush your pet’s teeth? Oral rinses can be a helpful alternative. Nothing replaces brushing, but anything you can do counts when it comes to oral health.
  • “Toothpaste Taste Test” – Next time you are in your veterinarian’s office, ask for your pet to get a taste test. This way your pet may think it’s a treat which will be helpful when introducing brushing.
  • Red gums are a sign of infection and inflammation known as gingivitis. Dogs and cats are predisposed to kidney disease and urinary tract infection by gingivitis. Deep cleaning under the gum line is the only effective treatment.
  • Does your dog or cat shy away from their face being brushed or petted? Dental disease is painful and could be the reason your fuzzy friend is hesitant to be touched around the chin and muzzle.
  • Bacteria in the mouth from plaque and gingivitis travels through the body and can cause infections in the bladder, kidneys and heart. A clean mouth is paramount to overall health. Brushing, Prescription Diet®t/d® pet food, dental chews and regular dental cleanings can keep your pet happy and healthy.
  • Dental care is just as important for pets as it is for us. Dental disease is painful and may make it difficult for your senior pet to eat. The first step is a veterinary exam and professional dental cleaning.
  • Gingivitis is associated with bladder infections, heart disease, kidney disease and other illnesses. To keep your pet healthy, have a dental exam annually to prevent disease.
  • Dental disease is a HUGE deal. Periodontal (gum) disease is the number-one diagnosed problem in dogs and cats. Scientific studies indicate a strong link between good oral health and vital organs such as the heart and kidneys. A healthy mouth is a healthy body.
  • Bad breath is an abnormal condition and can be an early symptom of dental problems. Just as in humans, dental conditions can damage not only your pet’s teeth and gums but its internal organs as well.
  • A proper dental cleaning for pets must be done under anesthesia. It is impossible to do a thorough cleaning and definitive oral examination (including periodontal probing) on a pet that is awake.
  • Take care of your pet’s teeth. Dental care is just as important for pets as it is for us. The first step is a veterinary exam and professional dental cleaning.
  • Signs of dental disease include: yellow and bown tartar deposits on the gum line, difficulty eating, swollen and bleeding gums, and bad breath. Dental disease affects overall health and should be addressed by your veterinarian.
  • Retained baby teeth still present in dogs after 6 months of age need to be extracted. Failing to remove them causes crowding of the teeth and creates a crevice where food becomes trapped, leading to gum disease.
  • 70% of cats and 80% of dogs over age 3 have dental disease. Managing your pet’s dental health begins with a veterinary dental exam.