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Fleas and Ticks

  • Flea-allergy dermatitis is a skin disease caused by a pet’s unusual sensitivity to flea bites. Intense scratching and biting are the most common signs. Reddened skin, bumps, self-inflicted abrasions and hair loss are also common.
  • Rattling dog tags keeping you awake? One flea bite may be all it takes to make your pet itch. Left untreated, itchy skin can become infected. Your veterinarian can help keep your pet healthy, itch-free and quiet!
  • Spring usually brings wet weather and a surge in the flea population. Keep your pet protected with monthly oral or topical flea prevention. It only takes a few fleas to start an infestation.
  • Do you go hiking with your pup? Be sure to use tick prevention every month. Frontline® is an excellent topical treatment. NexGard® is a beef-flavored chew which protects against ticks for 30 days.
  • Fleas are a common source of irritation to pets, but some are more sensitive to flea bites than others. The best way to protect your pet is to prevent infestation. We can help you choose which flea preventions are best for you.
  • Never use a dog flea and tick product on a cat. Cats are sensitive to some of the chemicals in dog flea and tick formulations. Using the wrong product on a cat can cause problems ranging from mild skin irritation to severe nervous system problems and even death.
  • Preventing flea and tick infestations not only prevents the irritation and associated discomfort, but also the risk for disease transmission.
  • A female flea can start laying eggs within 24 hours of feeding and mating, and has the ability to produce 40-50 eggs per day!
  • Hot spots are a common skin disorder in dogs, caused by intense chewing and licking. They are often caused by an insect bite, most commonly a flea. It’s common for a dog to experience recurrences.
  • Spring will be here before you know it, and with it comes wet weather and a surge in the flea population. Keep your pet protected with monthly oral or topical flea prevention. It only takes a few fleas to start an infestation.
  • Hot spots are very uncomfortable and painful for your dog, so veterinary care is warranted. Flea allergy is the most common cause of hot spots. Lesions are most commonly found on the rump or near the tail.
  • Flea allergy dermatitis accounts for half of all canine and feline dermatological cases. In dogs, watch for scratching around the tail base, rear and groin. Cats may scratch and lick and have crusty bumps around the neck.
  • When it comes to fleas, your home is an ideal environment for fleas to flourish! Your veterinary team can offer advice on how you can eliminate them.
  • The only effective means of battling fleas is to practice flea control and use effective treatments year-round. Talk to your vet about what product(s) will work best for your pet.
  • Just because you can’t see a flea doesn’t mean your pet hasn’t been bitten. One flea bite is all it takes to make your pet itch. Untreated, your furry friend can become downright miserable!
  • When it comes to fleas, your pet is mostly likely to become a target if it comes into contact with an infested area. Make sure to treat inside and outside the home.
  • If your pet swims, an oral flea prevention product that doesn’t wash off may be the best to use. Many of the oral products also prevent intestinal parasites and heartworms.
  • Fleas cause problems such as flea allergy dermatitis, anemia in severe cases and they can carry tapeworms.
  • Adult fleas begin feeding immediately on a host animal. Blood excreted by adult fleas dries into reddish-black pellets in the haircoat (“flea dirt”).
  • Over-the-counter flea products are not as potent or as effective as the prescription products you can get from your veterinarian. Some are even toxic if administered incorrectly.
  • In cold climates, fleas survive as adults on dogs and cats or wild mammals. Female fleas can produce 40 to 50 eggs per day. (nearly 3,000 fleas in two months!)
  • Make sure you’re using flea medication on ALL pets in your household, even if they don’t go outside. You, or other pets may bring fleas into the home, which can infest untreated pets.
  • In addition to controlling fleas on your pet, the house and yard must be treated. Be sure to wash pet bedding and vacuum carpets (make sure to seal and dispose of the bag). This will help eliminate fleas and prevent infestations in your home.
  • Tapeworms are a common parasite your dog or cat could get from swallowing a flea during grooming. The half-inch long worm-like egg packet can be seen on the stool or dried like a sesame seed on the haircoat under the tail. Ask your vet for treatment options.
  • Central heating and humidifiers mean flea reproduction can occur year round in many households. It is important to continue your flea control during all seasons.
  • Hot spots are very uncomfortable and painful for your dog, so veterinary care is warranted. Flea allergy is the most common cause of hot spots. Lesions are most commonly found on the rump or near the tail.
  • Make sure to keep up with your pet’s flea and tick preventive medication year round. There are many options, so ask your veterinarian which is best for your pet.