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Microchips and Pet ID

    • Microchipping your pet can mean the difference between lost and found. A microchip could be your pet’s ticket home. Does your pet have one?
    • Dog and cat collars and tags are important, but they can become damaged or slip off. A microchip is a permanent method of identifying your pet.
    • A microchip is a tiny computer chip about the size of a grain of rice. It is injected just under your pet’s skin between the shoulder blades. The procedure is not painful — in fact it’s similar to getting a vaccine.
    • Just as important as microchipping your pet, your contact information must be registered in an international database. It is critical this information is kept accurate and current!
    • Studies show that the presence of a microchip will increase your ability to find your lost pet by 74%. Without one, only 13% of pets are reunited with their families.
    • Once you’ve had your pet microchipped, don’t forget to register it and keep your contact information updated. This will increase your chances of being reunited with your pet if you are separated.
    • Please ensure the information associated with your pet’s microchip is current. This greatly increases the chances that you’ll get your pet back if lost or stolen.
    • All cats and dogs need to wear collars with ID tags, rabies vaccination tags and city or county licenses (where applicable). ID tags should include the owner’s name, address, telephone numbers (day and evening) and the pet’s name.
    • Remember that even indoor pets need tags. They could slip through an open door and quickly become lost in the neighborhood. Many strays in shelters are indoor pets who escaped and got lost.
    • When moving or traveling, place a temporary tag on your pet with the phone number of someone who knows how to reach you.
    • During your pet’s regular physical examinations by your veterinarian, the microchip should be scanned to ensure that it accurately transmits the identification number. Scanning is painless and only takes a few seconds.
    • Keep your pet’s licenses, ID tag, and microchip current. Make sure to update the tag and microchip if your address or phone numbers change.
    • For cats, use a specially made safety collar that has a short piece of elastic sewn in it. These collars allow the cat to escape if it gets caught on window blinds, furniture, fencing or other objects.
    • Is your pet microchipped? If not, make an appointment with your vet to have it done. The procedure is not painful — in fact it’s similar to getting a vaccine.
    • A microchip is one of the best ways to ensure your lost pet will be returned to you! Collars and ID tags are recommended however they can be easily removed or lost.
    • Just as important as microchipping your pet, your contact information must be registered in an international database. It is critical this information is kept accurate and current!
    • Having a microchip greatly increases the chance your pet will be returned to you in the event he or she escapes through an open door when you’re distracted with trick-or-treaters on Halloween.
    • Holidays mean more people coming and going through front doors of homes. Please make sure both cats and dogs are microchipped in case the door remains ajar a second too long.
    • Ensure your pet has proper identification should he get lost. Pets should be microchipped as well as wear a collar with a tag including your current contact information.
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Krystle holds “Tilly” while Dr. Garrolini scans her microchip.