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Preventive Care / Wellness

  • Just like physicians and dentists, veterinarians recommend annual wellness exams for healthy pets. Early detection of a problem results in more successful and less expensive treatment.
  • Check your pet’s coat and skin often. You will have a better chance of detecting any unusual lumps, bumps or areas of sensitivity on your pet’s body at an early stage.
  • Your veterinarian is in the best position to recommend how often your dog or cat should have a wellness examination, based on its age, lifestyle and health status.
  • Studies show that 56% of cat owners would take their pet to the veterinarian more often if they knew it could prevent problems and expensive treatment later.
  • If you have an indoor-only kitty, he or she should still be seen regularly by your veterinarian. Regular veterinary exams help detect brewing problems, which cats are particularly masterful at hiding.
  • Kidney disease is a leading cause of death in dogs and cats. Signs of this disease don’t appear until 75% of the kidney tissue is lost, which is why regular blood and urine screenings are recommended. When kidney disease is detected early, pets often live many years with treatment.
  • Routine physical examinations at every stage of your pet’s life can help prevent problems, or detect them early, when they are easier to treat.
  • Throughout their lives, your pets will likely be exposed to several infectious diseases that can cause severe illness or even death. Prevent infection through vaccination!
  • You can reduce the risk of health problems and help your pet live a longer, better quality life with regular veterinary care, annual screenings and feeding superior nutrition.
  • Our pets are prone to debilitating ailments as they age, such as kidney failure, heart disease, arthritis, dental disease and cancer. Regular visits are important for early detection.
  • You can help your pet live a longer, better quality life with regular veterinary care, including blood tests to screen for diseases often seen in older pets. Senior pets are advised to see a veterinarian every six months.
  • World Rabies Day is observed in September. Do your part by vaccinating your pets and keep them away from wildlife that can spread the disease. Rabies is 100% preventable!
  • Don’t allow your dog or cat to roam. If you let your pet roam free, it will be more at risk for rabies. Always supervise dogs when they are outside.
  • Your pet’s yearly checkup is essential to their health and well-being. It’s as important as feeding them daily and loving them forever. It’s the best way to keep your pet healthier, longer!
  • More than 10 percent of pets brought to veterinary clinics for checkups have some type of underlying disease or abnormality. When was your cat’s or dog’s last veterinary visit?
  • Every pet should have an annual physical examination. Finding problems early helps safeguard pets and ensure they receive proper care.
  • Pets should begin regular veterinary screenings when they reach the equivalent of fifty human years. This is around age seven for cats and small to medium dogs and age five for large breed dogs.
  • Diagnosing diseases early is important throughout a pet’s life. It becomes even more critical when your dog or cat enters its senior years. Some pets may not show any outward signs until a disease is quite advanced.
  • Cats are America’s #1 companion and yet they see veterinarians less frequently than dogs. Celebrate National Cat Day by taking your cat to the vet for an annual wellness visit. Healthy cats are happy cats!
  • Make an appointment for your pet to have a preventive care examination. These important exams will help your pet live a longer, healthier life.