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Puppies and Kittens

  • Canine parvovirus is highly contagious and attacks the gastrointestinal tract of infected dogs. Puppies under one year of age are at higher risk. Effective vaccines are available and recommended for all dogs.
  • Some puppies don’t lose their baby teeth normally which can lead to crowding in the mouth and an abnormal bite. Retained teeth may need to be extracted at about six months of age.
  • Canine parvovirus is highly contagious and attacks the gastrointestinal tract of infected dogs. Puppies under one year of age are at higher risk. Effective vaccines are available and recommended for all dogs.
  • Did you know that puppies have their eyes closed for the first twelve days of life? Eyes and ears finish development after birth and open when they are ready.
  • Be sure to start your new puppy’s vaccines by eight weeks of age to prevent infectious diseases like parvo and distemper. Check with us to find out what your puppy needs.
  • Did you know puppies can be infected with intestinal parasites in the womb or through their mother’s milk? Hookworms and roundworms are very clever at finding new hosts. Always have your new puppy’s stool checked for parasites by a veterinarian.
  • Spaying female dogs significantly lowers the risk of developing breast cancer or uterine disease. It is recommended this be done before the first “heat” cycle, usually around six months of age.
  • Puppies need structure, consistency and lots of positive reinforcement. But most of all, they need your time. Every minute you spend training, socializing and preventing problems will save you time and frustration down the road.
  • Like children, puppies need structure and rules: praise when they do right, corrections when they make mistakes and a safe place to retreat, such as a crate.
  • Large breed puppies grow quickly, which puts them at risk for developmental skeletal conditions such as hip dysplasia. Overfeeding can increase this risk by accelerating the growth of their bones and joints.
  • Never give a puppy or dog anything to chew on that is harder than its own teeth. This includes cow bones, nylon bones and other real bones. They can break a dog’s teeth which can be quite painful.
  • All cats can benefit from increased water intake, and is essential in the presence of kidney disease or lower urinary tract disease. Since most cats don’t like changes in their food it’s a good idea to introduce canned food in small amounts when it is a kitten.
  • When you get a puppy, training begins immediately!. Training classes provide you with the skills and knowledge for dealing with common, normal dog behaviors—starting with puppy behaviors such as housetraining and chewing.
  • Providing your puppy with a broad range of experiences prior to 4 months of age is a critical factor in raising a stable, confident dog. Socialization includes being exposed to a variety of other puppies, people, places, things and activities.
  • While there is little risk to socializing your puppy in public, there is a small possibility your puppy will be exposed to illness. Veterinarians and training professionals believe the advantages of socialization far outweigh the minimal risk of illness.
  • Having a trained dog builds your mutual bond, enhances the partnership and enriches the relationship you share with your dog. Training has been shown to be the single most important thing that keeps a dog in his or her “furever” home.
  • The prime socialization period for a puppy is between 8-16 weeks of age. This is the time when exposure to other animals, people, noises and experiences will shape the dog he or she becomes.